Pioneer Museum

Chapter 3: Early People of the Americas: Teacher Information

Chapter 3: Early People of the Americas: Teacher Information

Enduring Understanding:

  1. When a culture does not have a written history one can still learn about that culture through the artifacts and ruins left behind.
  2. People are able to survive on how they use land around them

Essential Questions:

What does the word prehistory mean?
What are archeologist’s duties?
How can we learn about people and places that existed before there were written records?
What have archeologists learned that have helped them learn about the lives of prehistoric people in present day Arizona?
What were the lives of the Paleo-Indians like?
How did farming change the way people lived?
What clues show that prehistoric people traded with each other?

Standards:

Strand 1 Concept 1 PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4,
Strand 1 Concept 2 PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4, PO5

Performance Objectives:

  • Students will be able to use graphs, timelines, tables, charts and maps to interpret historical data.
  • Students will be able to describe the difference between primary and secondary sources.
  • Students will be able to location information using both primary and secondary resources.
  • Students will be able to describe how archeologists’ research adds to our understanding of the past.
  • Students will be able to describe the legacy and cultures of prehistoric people in America
  • Students will be able to describe the cultures and contributions of the Mogollon, Ancestra Puebloans and Hohokam.
  • Students will be able to identify other groups residing in the Southwest during this period
  • Students will be able to identify the early civilizations that developed into empires in Central and South America.
  • Students will be able to recognize the achievements and features of the Mayan, Aztec, and Incan civilizations.