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Chapter 7: From Territory to State: Teacher Information

Chapter 7: From Territory to State: Teacher Information

Enduring Understanding:

  1. Arizona needed to become a part of the United States and the United States needed Arizona.
  2. Arizona’s statehood was not easily granted.

Essential Questions:

How was the Arizona territory changing?
Why was water important to people in the Arizona Territory?
Why did health seekers come to the Arizona Territory?
Why did some people not want the Arizona territory to become a state?
Why did President Taft not approve the first draft of the Arizona constitution?
How did electricity change people’s lives?
Why did tourists start coming to Arizona?

Standards:

Strand 1 Concept 7 PO1 PO3 PO4
Strand 3 Concept 1 PO3
Strand 4 Concept 4 PO1 PO2 PO5

Performance Objectives:

  • Students will be able to describe the economic development of Arizona.
  • Students will be able to identify key individuals and groups (e.g., Charles Poston, Sharlot Hall, Buffalo Soldiers, Geronimo, George W.P. Hunt, Manuelito, Cochise) related to Arizona territorial days and early statehood.
  • Students will be able to recognize that Arizona changed from a territory to a state on February 14, 1912.
  • Students will be able to Describe the factors (push and pull) that have contributed to the settlement, economic development (e.g., mining, ranching, agriculture, and tourism), and growth of major Arizona cities.
  • Students will be able to describe how Mexico and Arizona are connected by the movement of people, goods, and ideas.
  • Students will be able to describe the major economic activities and land use patterns (e.g., agricultural, industrial, residential, commercial, recreational, harvesting of natural resources) of regions studied.
  • Students will be able to describe Arizona’s transition from territory to statehood.